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Aaron Pearson
Vice President of Public Relations

How can 3D printing significantly reduce the time and expense of producing composite tooling? That’s exactly what visitors to the Stratasys booth at SAMPE 2016 came to find out. On display was a full range of tooling solutions for high-end manufacturing applications that demonstrated how 3D printing can replace traditional hard tooling technologies - optimizing resources.

If you weren’t lucky enough to spend the week at SAMPE 2016 in sunny Long Beach, California, you can take a quick tour of the Stratasys booth with Tim Schniepp, Stratasys’ Director of Composite Tooling.

You’ll see…


ULTEM-1010 Large layup tool, produced with Stratasys’ ULTEM 1010™ material for a Dassault Falcon Jet interior cabin part.

This large layup tool, produced with Stratasys’ ULTEM 1010™ material for a Dassault Falcon Jet interior cabin part:


sacrificial-tooling-3d-printing Hollow inlet duct from Swift Engineering which was produced using Stratasys’ new Sacrificial Tooling solution.

This hollow inlet duct from Swift Engineering which was produced using Stratasys’ new Sacrificial Tooling solution:


rubber-overmolding-3d-printing 3D printed molding for rubber manufacturing, including rubber compression molding, rubber injection molding and mandrels for rubber overmolding[/caption]

3D printed molding for rubber manufacturing, including rubber compression molding, rubber injection molding and mandrels for rubber overmolding:

SAMPE 2016 was also the debut of the new Stratasys “FDM for Composite Tooling Design Guide” which covers:


  • Choosing the appropriate FDM 3D printing material based on design criteria

  • Designing tools using the most effective methods of construction

  • Processing the CAD file for optimal build results

  • Post-processing tools to achieve the best composite fabrication results


Order your free copy of the new Design Guide here.