Victoria University of Wellington

In New Zealand, the word “tutū” means to fidget or fiddle with something allowing you to learn with your hands. For Victoria University of Wellington (VUW), 3D printing is an outstanding educational tool for tutū, helping students across many disciplines understand complex theories and prepare for the workforce.

“The industrial design profession has historically used 3D printing technology to make prototypes of products that will be mass produced using traditional mechanical engineering methods,” said Ross Stevens, program director of the university’s Industrial Design department. “As my experience with 3D printing processes grew, I became more interested in the printers’ ability to make the traditionally un-makeable. This shift led to intricate and diverse objects more derived from bio engineering than mechanical engineering.”


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Dynamic tendrils and multi-colored sea creature were 3D printed on a Connex.

Dynamic tendrils and multi-colored sea creature were 3D printed on a Connex.

“As my experience with 3D printing processes grew, I became more interested in the printers’ ability to make the traditionally un-makeable. This shift led to intricate and diverse objects more derived from bio engineering than mechanical engineering.”

Ross Stevens, Victoria University of Wellington