VER

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a final inning close-up of the blood, sweat and tears on a Major League pitcher’s face is priceless. “These shots are telling the story of the pitcher,” says Patrick Campbell, director of global camera operations at VER, in Glendale, California. “It’s the drama of the game. And in later innings it’s the picture of whatever’s going through the pitcher’s mind.” This key camera angle is possible only with a low camera positioned directly behind home plate. But it’s precisely this prime real estate that’s been lost in widespread ballpark renovations in recent years. With additional seats installed in this coveted position, a few season ticket holders have an exclusive corner on the view once shared with the home viewer.


Download
VER’s camera “number one” with a wider-angle camera lens in use courtside.

VER’s camera “number one” with a wider-angle camera lens in use courtside.

“None of this would have been feasible without 3D printing. We printed whatever parts we could because we didn’t want to send it to manufacturing and lose control over the timing and the quality. There’s a real benefit to having a part in your hand and evaluating it with very little effort or manpower.”

Patrick Campbell, VER