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Bone Daggers, FEA and 3D Printing - How can researching the past impact the future?

What: Bone Daggers, FEA, and 3D Printing Webinar
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Join Sam Mills, mechanical engineer and research assistant at the University of Colorado, Denver Smart Materials and Biomechanics laboratory, as he shares the story of his part in the study of bone daggers, what understanding their material properties taught him about the history of the people of New Guinea and the future the biomedical engineering and how 3D printing played a role in the journey.

When ancient artifacts, additive and engineering combine some pretty amazing learnings can occur. “Bone daggers were once widespread in New Guinea. Their purpose was both symbolic and utilitarian; they functioned as objects of artistic expression with the primary use as a deadly weapon.” But, in 2018 in the United States, the primary purpose of these bone daggers, made from human and animal bone, were not death, but the opposite, knowledge on life.

Hear in depth about FEA analysis, materials properties and testing and how it all connects to 21st century biomedical and biomechanical research and innovation.

A human bone dagger (top) from New Guinea and a cassowary bone dagger (bottom), attributed to the Abelam people of New Guinea .

A human bone dagger (top) from New Guinea and a cassowary bone dagger (bottom), attributed to the Abelam people of New Guinea
Credit: Copyright Hood Museum of Art/Dartmouth College; Dominy NJ. et al, Royal Society Open Science

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