3D printed bicycle made on Objet1000.

Consumer Goods Case Studies

3D printing makes great products better

Before a Trek bicycle speeds you down the road or a Black & Decker tool helps you improve your home, these products are ideas in the minds of designers and engineers. Prototyping gives them form and makes perfection possible.

The quickest way to get accurate prototypes is with 3D printing. Learn how it makes product design faster and better, and designers more confident.

Customer

Description

Industry

Technology

adidas

With the ability to print models made from multiple materials, including composite Digital Materials created on the fly, the adidas Group can now perform functional testing in the early stage of the design and development process. 

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

Akaishi

Using the system to make polycarbonate prototypes, Akaishi has tested designs without breakage even when strong forces were applied. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Artic Spas

Molds can cost up to $25,000, and with Dimension, we know we have an accurate model before beginning that stage of the development process," notes Arctic Spas' CAD department manager Pete Van't Hoff. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Bianchi Bikes

The company now produces a number of prototype parts using a Dimension 3D Printer, including bicycle frames, forks, components for compatibility testing and model validation.

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Black and Decker

The company chose the Dimension 3D Printer from Stratasys which prints tough, durable, high-quality ABS models. Having the machine in-house has completely changed product development cycles by making the process shorter and more efficient. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Bondy Fiesta

Bondy Fiesta uses the Objet Eden260V 3D Printer during all stages of product design. 

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

Bravilor Bonamat

Bravilor Bonamat selected Dimension SST®, which incorporates an automated soluble support removal system, which gives users greater convenience in the design process by reducing engineering time and enabling the development of prototypes with more complex design geometries. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Cool Gear

Cool Gear, Inc. is known for its ability to conceptualize and develop ideas, so the idea to move its modeling function from hand-crafted clay models to CAD and prototyping came naturally. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Culligan

Culligan selected a Dimension BST 3D Printer, which is a networked desktop modeling system that builds functional 3D models with durable ABS plastic from the bottom up, one layer at a time. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Designs for Hope

The group set out to design an inexpensive, durable device that would hold a generator on a bike, harvest its power and condition the electricity to feed a battery. They began making prototypes on a Dimension 3D Printer. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Dial

With the addition of the Dimension 3D printer, the Home Care design team has significantly reduced the time it takes to produce models for review by the marketing and consumer groups. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Fender

With its Objet Eden350V, says Greene, the Fender design team can prototype a part within hours versus weeks – so they are doing a lot more of it. 

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

Flexmedia

Flexmedia Electronics Corporation saved 63 percent on prototyped part costs by incorporating an Objet 3D Printer into its development process. What’s more, it improved its design schedule and part quality for concept modeling and functional testing.

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

Henk and I design firm

“The Dimension 3D printer gives us the ability to produce parts throughout the entire design process,” van der Meijden said. “We have the machine continuously busy and can produce most parts in a single day or overnight on the machine. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Hoyu Tooling

The Objet Connex500 provides a unique ability to simultaneously print parts and assemblies made of multiple materials with different mechanical or physical properties – all in a single build. 

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

IRIS Ohyama

IRIS Ohyama began using 3D printers when it branched into the home appliance industry to speed its R&D and design processes. Using both Objet and Dimension 3D Printers, IRIS Ohyama saw its home appliance sector grow 200%.

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Consumer Goods

FDM and PolyJet

Logitech FDM

With FDM, the ability to run functional tests resulted in improved reliability and comfort for Logitech’s Mobile Bluetooth® Headset. Logitech recently updated the headset design to eliminate a problem that occurred for some users. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Logitech Polyjet

“Having Objet internally is a big bonus…Being able to spontaneously print a design has really changed the entire process flow of our product design.”
--Kevin Forde, Design Engineer, Cork Design Center 

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

m3 Design

"What drove us to Dimension was the ABS plastic material used to create the 3D models," said Carver. “We can sand, cut, paint and glue our models.” 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

MCD Racing

"It takes only one day to produce a prototype part on the Dimension 3D printer," Yazici said. "So we can now prototype nearly every new part to see how it looks, how it fits together with other parts and run it on the track to see how it performs before ordering production tooling." 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Nemo

“Rapid prototyping is extremely important to our business,” said Davey. “It helps us keep things fresh and quickly turn designs into production quality parts. Prototyping with the Dimension saves us two or three months from concept to production on any one part.” 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Nestle Nespresso

The use of ABS plastic makes it possible to produce mechanically stable parts in the Dimension printer. Nespresso conducts function tests on the models, creating brewing units, handles, capsule holders and hot plates for cups as well as other parts of a Nespresso machine as models and testing their functions in a subsequent step. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Norgaard

"The Dimension 3D printer is the best investment I have ever made in my studio," Norgaard said. "We save time, arrive at the final product stages much faster and it is much easier to explain the product to our clients. Our customers now have the ability to more accurately see how the product will appear in real life." 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Oreck

"Using direct digital manufacturing reduces fixture production costs by up to 65 percent, because we produce the fixtures in-house," says Fish. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Oxysure

Since the introduction of the Dimension system into OxySure's design process, Steve Dunford, senior engineer, estimates that the cost per part produced, including overhead, is at least 50 percent less than it was when the company relied on the service bureau. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Pedal Brain

“FDM has substantially improved our design process by enabling us to go from concept to reality in about two hours at a cost of $10 for the typical part,” Bauer said. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Peppermint Energy

Once engineers had honed the device as far as possible in CAD, Peppermint needed a physical prototype. “It was hard for anybody, including me, to truly appreciate size and scale when you’re looking at it onscreen,” Gramm said. At three feet wide and likely to weigh 60 pounds, the FORTY2 required a seriously robust housing, complex and strong enough to hold all of its components. FDM® was the only 3D printing method that could deliver.

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Polaris

Engineers designed the carrier rack in Pro/E and built it using a Stratasys 3D Production System, employing the FDM additive fabrication process. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Puma

“The Objet 3D Printer enables us to reduce our prototype production time by 75%, from 4 days to 1 day. It helps us communicate between remote sites, reduce design mistakes, and avoid unstable tooling.”
--Andy Chung, Tooling & 3D Engineer, PUMA  

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

Siligan Plastics

Silgan built FDM prototypes of the 10 design concepts over a 48-hour period at a cost of $30 in materials and $270 in FDM machine time and overhead for each. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Tape Wrangler

Tape Wrangler is a product development and manufacturing company that attributes rapid revenue growth in large part to product design made nimble by a move to in-house 3D printing. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Thermos

Since adopting 3D printing, Matsuyama’s team builds prototypes faster and at a reduced cost. Previously, outsourcing a typical prototype took three to five days. “But now we can do it internally, and finish a prototype in hours. If it’s a small part, the job is done in minutes,” Matsuyama says.

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Consumer Goods

FDM and PolyJet

Toro

"Our 3D Production System generated accurate prototypes. And it took only a few hours for a typical component." Their system enabled Toro to perfect designs for a fraction of what they might have cost. 

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Consumer Goods

FDM

Trek Bicycle

Trek’s designers are thrilled with the Objet Connex – instead of waiting days or weeks for their prototypes, they can now hold a part in their hands in as little as 30 minutes. 

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Consumer Goods

PolyJet

Zebra

Zebra – on the forefront of cutting-edge writing tools in Japan for over 100 years – sharpened its writing instrument creation process with the acquisition of an Objet 3D Printer, greatly speeding up time to market

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Consumer Goods

Polyjet

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